10/7/2021

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From chess to StarCraft, here are 10 classic strategy games that will challenge - and strengthen - your brain.

  • Chess: King of games

    The word chess is derived from the Persian 'shah,' which means king. The board was developed between the third and sixth centuries in India and is comprised of 64 small squares. Only two players can play against each other, using 16 pieces each. The aim is to checkmate your opponent by threatening their king in such a way that it cannot escape or be freed by another piece in the next move.

  • Go: Made in Asia

    Go originated in China, but was largely developed in Korea and Japan. It's played with black and white stones on a board crisscrossed by 19 horizontal and 19 vertical lines. Stones are placed on the intersections of the lines, with the aim being not to eliminate your opponent but to capture a majority of the board.

  • Shogi: Japanese chess

    This Japanese variation of chess is played on a board divided into nine fields, though smaller or larger boards are also common. There's one important difference between shogi and chess: In the Japanese version, pieces are not assigned to a particular player, but can be used by both. Checkmate, however, is still the aim of the game.

  • Checkers: Jump and steal

    A checkers board looks like a chessboard, but the rules differ greatly. In this case, players can only move their pieces diagonally across the darker squares, one square at a time, until they are able to capture their opponent's piece by jumping over it. The winner is the first to steal all of the other player's pieces. Checkers is also known as draughts and is called 'Dame' ('lady') in German.

  • Nine Men's Morris: Mill's the game

    The board consists of three squares of gradually smaller size drawn within each other. Two players participate with nine tiles each. The aim is to get three of the tiles in a row, known as a mill, which allows you to remove one of your opponent's tiles. The winner is the first to reduce his opponent to two tiles, thereby hindering a three-tile mill.

  • Tic-tac-toe: Circle or square?

    It's perhaps the best game for long car trips, because all you need is a pencil and piece of paper. Tic-tac-toe dates back to the 12th century. Two players alternate in drawing an X or an O on a nine-square grid. The first player to create a row - horizontally, vertically or diagonally - wins. Tic-tac-toe was one of the first strategy games played on computers.

  • 'Connect Four': The vertical board

    It's also considered a board game - but it's played vertically. 'Connect Four' was introduced in 1974 and is a game for two players. The first to get four tiles of their color in a row - vertically, horizontally or diagonally - wins. It's similar to tic-tac-toe, except there are 42 open squares instead of just nine.

  • 'Civilization': From the board to the screen

    Initially conceived as a board game, 'Civilization' was introduced in 1980. The idea was complex: A civilization must survive hardships from antiquity to the Iron Age. Seven players can play simultaneously and one game can last up to 10 hours. In 1991, 'Civilization' was launched as a computer game and became an international hit.

  • 'Anno': Playing with people and resources

    Another favorite resource-related game is 'Anno,' introduced in 1998. The idea behind it is to discover and populate fictional islands and then meet the needs of the new island residents. It's also possible for players to compete against each other - simulating attacks and trade.

  • 'StarCraft': A national pastime

    For some it may be a simple diversion, but in South Korea 'StarCraft' is a national pastime. The real-time strategy game was introduced in 1998 and has remained one of the most popular computer games on the market. Player build a base, collect resources and acquire soldiers to fight their opponents. Online tournaments are of national importance in South Korea - and even open to spectators.


  • Chess: King of games

    The word chess is derived from the Persian 'shah,' which means king. The board was developed between the third and sixth centuries in India and is comprised of 64 small squares. Only two players can play against each other, using 16 pieces each. The aim is to checkmate your opponent by threatening their king in such a way that it cannot escape or be freed by another piece in the next move.

  • Go: Made in Asia

    Go originated in China, but was largely developed in Korea and Japan. It's played with black and white stones on a board crisscrossed by 19 horizontal and 19 vertical lines. Stones are placed on the intersections of the lines, with the aim being not to eliminate your opponent but to capture a majority of the board.

  • Shogi: Japanese chess

    This Japanese variation of chess is played on a board divided into nine fields, though smaller or larger boards are also common. There's one important difference between shogi and chess: In the Japanese version, pieces are not assigned to a particular player, but can be used by both. Checkmate, however, is still the aim of the game.

  • Checkers: Jump and steal

    A checkers board looks like a chessboard, but the rules differ greatly. In this case, players can only move their pieces diagonally across the darker squares, one square at a time, until they are able to capture their opponent's piece by jumping over it. The winner is the first to steal all of the other player's pieces. Checkers is also known as draughts and is called 'Dame' ('lady') in German.

  • Nine Men's Morris: Mill's the game

    The board consists of three squares of gradually smaller size drawn within each other. Two players participate with nine tiles each. The aim is to get three of the tiles in a row, known as a mill, which allows you to remove one of your opponent's tiles. The winner is the first to reduce his opponent to two tiles, thereby hindering a three-tile mill.

  • Tic-tac-toe: Circle or square?

    It's perhaps the best game for long car trips, because all you need is a pencil and piece of paper. Tic-tac-toe dates back to the 12th century. Two players alternate in drawing an X or an O on a nine-square grid. The first player to create a row - horizontally, vertically or diagonally - wins. Tic-tac-toe was one of the first strategy games played on computers.

  • 'Connect Four': The vertical board

    It's also considered a board game - but it's played vertically. 'Connect Four' was introduced in 1974 and is a game for two players. The first to get four tiles of their color in a row - vertically, horizontally or diagonally - wins. It's similar to tic-tac-toe, except there are 42 open squares instead of just nine.

  • 'Civilization': From the board to the screen

    Initially conceived as a board game, 'Civilization' was introduced in 1980. The idea was complex: A civilization must survive hardships from antiquity to the Iron Age. Seven players can play simultaneously and one game can last up to 10 hours. In 1991, 'Civilization' was launched as a computer game and became an international hit.

  • 'Anno': Playing with people and resources

    Another favorite resource-related game is 'Anno,' introduced in 1998. The idea behind it is to discover and populate fictional islands and then meet the needs of the new island residents. It's also possible for players to compete against each other - simulating attacks and trade.

  • 'StarCraft': A national pastime

    For some it may be a simple diversion, but in South Korea 'StarCraft' is a national pastime. The real-time strategy game was introduced in 1998 and has remained one of the most popular computer games on the market. Player build a base, collect resources and acquire soldiers to fight their opponents. Online tournaments are of national importance in South Korea - and even open to spectators.


Compelling themes, smart mechanics, comprehensive rules — there are so many factors that need to come together before a game can qualify as one of the best strategy board games for adults.A few. Whether you’re into round-based combat, real-time management, or grand strategy, on this list you’ll find only the best strategy games to play right now. Offworld Trading Company. This HD edition features the original game, of course, Age of Empires. Each game has multiple campaigns for one player, but we also have free play in skirmishes or online. Basically, it is an old game, which still has its fame constant, so, if you have a PC, then you should try this best strategy game for the PC of all time. Total War: Warhammer II. Looking back at it now, 2020 doesn’t feel like a banner year for strategy games, but that doesn’t mean there haven’t been a few gems. The list below – gathered by a panel of experts and regularly updated – contains games from as recently as 12 months ago alongside classics from as far back as 28 years ago.

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Lifestyle

From chess to StarCraft, here are 10 classic strategy games that will challenge - and strengthen - your brain.

  • Chess: King of games

    The word chess is derived from the Persian 'shah,' which means king. The board was developed between the third and sixth centuries in India and is comprised of 64 small squares. Only two players can play against each other, using 16 pieces each. The aim is to checkmate your opponent by threatening their king in such a way that it cannot escape or be freed by another piece in the next move.

  • Go: Made in Asia

    Go originated in China, but was largely developed in Korea and Japan. It's played with black and white stones on a board crisscrossed by 19 horizontal and 19 vertical lines. Stones are placed on the intersections of the lines, with the aim being not to eliminate your opponent but to capture a majority of the board.

  • Shogi: Japanese chess

    This Japanese variation of chess is played on a board divided into nine fields, though smaller or larger boards are also common. There's one important difference between shogi and chess: In the Japanese version, pieces are not assigned to a particular player, but can be used by both. Checkmate, however, is still the aim of the game.

  • Checkers: Jump and steal

    A checkers board looks like a chessboard, but the rules differ greatly. In this case, players can only move their pieces diagonally across the darker squares, one square at a time, until they are able to capture their opponent's piece by jumping over it. The winner is the first to steal all of the other player's pieces. Checkers is also known as draughts and is called 'Dame' ('lady') in German.

  • Nine Men's Morris: Mill's the game

    The board consists of three squares of gradually smaller size drawn within each other. Two players participate with nine tiles each. The aim is to get three of the tiles in a row, known as a mill, which allows you to remove one of your opponent's tiles. The winner is the first to reduce his opponent to two tiles, thereby hindering a three-tile mill.

  • Tic-tac-toe: Circle or square?

    It's perhaps the best game for long car trips, because all you need is a pencil and piece of paper. Tic-tac-toe dates back to the 12th century. Two players alternate in drawing an X or an O on a nine-square grid. The first player to create a row - horizontally, vertically or diagonally - wins. Tic-tac-toe was one of the first strategy games played on computers.

  • 'Connect Four': The vertical board

    It's also considered a board game - but it's played vertically. 'Connect Four' was introduced in 1974 and is a game for two players. The first to get four tiles of their color in a row - vertically, horizontally or diagonally - wins. It's similar to tic-tac-toe, except there are 42 open squares instead of just nine.

  • 'Civilization': From the board to the screen

    Initially conceived as a board game, 'Civilization' was introduced in 1980. The idea was complex: A civilization must survive hardships from antiquity to the Iron Age. Seven players can play simultaneously and one game can last up to 10 hours. In 1991, 'Civilization' was launched as a computer game and became an international hit.

  • 'Anno': Playing with people and resources

    Another favorite resource-related game is 'Anno,' introduced in 1998. The idea behind it is to discover and populate fictional islands and then meet the needs of the new island residents. It's also possible for players to compete against each other - simulating attacks and trade.

  • 'StarCraft': A national pastime

    For some it may be a simple diversion, but in South Korea 'StarCraft' is a national pastime. The real-time strategy game was introduced in 1998 and has remained one of the most popular computer games on the market. Player build a base, collect resources and acquire soldiers to fight their opponents. Online tournaments are of national importance in South Korea - and even open to spectators.

The best strategy games were massively multiplayer online (MMO) strategy games, giving players the chance to enter virtual worlds where hundreds, if not thousands, of opponents were waiting to challenge them. The increasing number of players also led to a larger revenue base, which made the free-to-play model feasible.


  • Chess: King of games

    The word chess is derived from the Persian 'shah,' which means king. The board was developed between the third and sixth centuries in India and is comprised of 64 small squares. Only two players can play against each other, using 16 pieces each. The aim is to checkmate your opponent by threatening their king in such a way that it cannot escape or be freed by another piece in the next move.

  • Go: Made in Asia

    Go originated in China, but was largely developed in Korea and Japan. It's played with black and white stones on a board crisscrossed by 19 horizontal and 19 vertical lines. Stones are placed on the intersections of the lines, with the aim being not to eliminate your opponent but to capture a majority of the board.

  • Shogi: Japanese chess

    This Japanese variation of chess is played on a board divided into nine fields, though smaller or larger boards are also common. There's one important difference between shogi and chess: In the Japanese version, pieces are not assigned to a particular player, but can be used by both. Checkmate, however, is still the aim of the game.

  • Checkers: Jump and steal

    A checkers board looks like a chessboard, but the rules differ greatly. In this case, players can only move their pieces diagonally across the darker squares, one square at a time, until they are able to capture their opponent's piece by jumping over it. The winner is the first to steal all of the other player's pieces. Checkers is also known as draughts and is called 'Dame' ('lady') in German.

  • Nine Men's Morris: Mill's the game

    The board consists of three squares of gradually smaller size drawn within each other. Two players participate with nine tiles each. The aim is to get three of the tiles in a row, known as a mill, which allows you to remove one of your opponent's tiles. The winner is the first to reduce his opponent to two tiles, thereby hindering a three-tile mill.

  • Tic-tac-toe: Circle or square?

    It's perhaps the best game for long car trips, because all you need is a pencil and piece of paper. Tic-tac-toe dates back to the 12th century. Two players alternate in drawing an X or an O on a nine-square grid. The first player to create a row - horizontally, vertically or diagonally - wins. Tic-tac-toe was one of the first strategy games played on computers.

  • 'Connect Four': The vertical board

    It's also considered a board game - but it's played vertically. 'Connect Four' was introduced in 1974 and is a game for two players. The first to get four tiles of their color in a row - vertically, horizontally or diagonally - wins. It's similar to tic-tac-toe, except there are 42 open squares instead of just nine.

  • 'Civilization': From the board to the screen

    Initially conceived as a board game, 'Civilization' was introduced in 1980. The idea was complex: A civilization must survive hardships from antiquity to the Iron Age. Seven players can play simultaneously and one game can last up to 10 hours. In 1991, 'Civilization' was launched as a computer game and became an international hit.

  • 'Anno': Playing with people and resources

    Another favorite resource-related game is 'Anno,' introduced in 1998. The idea behind it is to discover and populate fictional islands and then meet the needs of the new island residents. It's also possible for players to compete against each other - simulating attacks and trade.

  • 'StarCraft': A national pastime

    For some it may be a simple diversion, but in South Korea 'StarCraft' is a national pastime. The real-time strategy game was introduced in 1998 and has remained one of the most popular computer games on the market. Player build a base, collect resources and acquire soldiers to fight their opponents. Online tournaments are of national importance in South Korea - and even open to spectators.

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